I have noticed a substantial uptick in questions relating to practical implementation of physics in video game development. (Here is a search link for such questions.) Some of these appear to be homework related, some of them border on crowdsourcing. Just wondering what the thoughts of the community are on these sorts of questions.

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I'm curious about one thing: What makes you think that some of them are homework material? –  Alenanno Jan 27 '13 at 16:12
    
Well, for starters, this question, physics.stackexchange.com/questions/52235/… –  Hal Swyers Jan 27 '13 at 16:16
    
And to amplify, I first looked at this with sincerity, and then found myself whipping out my old book on statics and dynamics for engineers and said...hmmm... –  Hal Swyers Jan 27 '13 at 16:18
    
Ah I see. :D I was just curious about what was the factor that made you think differently from other questions. :) –  Alenanno Jan 27 '13 at 16:27
    
Suggestion to the question(v2): Change the title to Should we allow game development questions? –  Qmechanic Jan 27 '13 at 16:29
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Does anyone know (1) if GaveDev.SE accepts game physics questions and (2) how well they answer them? –  dmckee Jan 27 '13 at 16:49
    
To answer my own questions: they do have a physics tag, but the questions I have investigated have so far had little physics content in them: more along the lines of "these are the questions to ask your physics engine and when to ask them". –  dmckee Jan 27 '13 at 17:09
    
@dmckee: They sorta do, I've answered this and this (the second one was migrated from physics.se). Both seem on topic. –  Manishearth Jan 28 '13 at 5:45

2 Answers 2

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I'm going to suggest some possible limits.

  1. We only answer questions about physics. Implementation questions go elsewhere. Likewise questions about software toolkits.
  2. We only answer questions about real physics, but we include the various approximations that are common in physics teaching: neglecting friction, neglecting air resistance, linearizing nearly everything, simple impulse collisions, etc.

    It is the asker's responsibility to identify the approximation regime they want to know about, and we don't advise them on how these decision will affect their implementation.

  3. We answer only about physics in the general sense and do not solve individual instances of problems--this is in keeping with out homework policy.
  4. We police these rigorously for duplicates, and identify those on the basis of the "Same answer?" criteria.
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The ones asking for code are off topic and ought to be migrated to gamedev.se.

The ones which are just in the context of writing a game are generally on topic (flag if unsure).

BUT, the HW policy does apply to crowdsourcing questions like these. The HW policy is about the type of question, not the context in which it crops up. Thus, if it doesn't follow the HW policy, it ought to be closed (or migrated if possible)

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Both of these answers are think are on the money –  Hal Swyers Jan 28 '13 at 2:07

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